B.C. Camp, Day 1: Mobile editing

By Jiří Královec (instagram @opocor)

The idea behind this tip.

Technology has been evolving really fast in the past few years - and so has photography. By now, mobile phones became really good competitors to compact cameras, and the way we think about taking pictures changed a lot. There is, however, one aspect that has changed a lot, too - but is still being a bit overlooked: I am speaking of postproduction workflow. 

    Today, there is no need to send one’s pictures to a desktop to do all the editing; even mobile devices make editing easy, intuitive and fast - much faster than ever before. Photojournalists can use their iPads to adjust their pictures instantly wherever they are and share them with their audience - now the whole process takes minutes instead of hours. Not all photographers, of course, go along with this workflow: for years, they were used to something completely different and the technological change may be too radical for them to accept. Nevertheless, there are many professionals who already do utilize these tools to produce high quality output.

Even if the picture is not perfect, its quality can be remarkably and rapidly increased - virtually in a minute.

My editing workflow is sometimes rather complex and does involve mobile device as well as a computer, but I don’t want to bore you with loooooong texts about boring procedures I normally apply to some of my shots and which may be of no use for you. Instead, I would like to show you exact editing steps you may find useful when shooting with Hasselnuts - and all the editing can be done right in your phone. Even if the picture is not perfect, its quality can be remarkably and rapidly increased - virtually in a minute - if you know what exactly to do.

    When editing a picture, it is always good not to “overadjust" it, keep it simple. Don’t do things in haste, take time to to come back to your pictures with fresh mind - and don’t allow them to be turned into kitsch.

 

Always think about the picture in advance and try to define what exactly would you like to achieve

Tools we have at our disposal allow us to do incredible things but try not to over focus on the technical aspects. Always think about the picture in advance and try to define what exactly would you like to achieve - I love editing pictures but I often think about what and how to edit already when shooting, and sometimes even before that. I personally don’t think that editing may help to turn ugly pictures into great ones. No - I try to take a picture which, hopefully, is great by itself - and I then use editing to achieve desired effects...

The pictures don’t always capture the original scene faithfully and through editing, you can partly restore its original, authenticatmosphere. 

Our brain perceives and processes things differently than a camera does. Pictures “don’t forgive” —  and what may seem nice to your eye doesn’t always appear in the final image. Editing can help: just try to think how to tell your story better, how to make it simple, how to remove from the picture all that’s disturbing. (Also cropping can be really valuable — I would like to devote my next mini post to cropping, so stay tuned! :-)